How should we judge a government?

In Malaysia, if you don't watch television or read newspapers, you are uninformed; but if you do, you are misinformed!

"If you're not careful, the newspapers will have you hating the people who are being oppressed, and loving the people who are doing the oppressing." - Malcolm X

Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience - Mark Twain
Never argue with an idiot, otherwise people won't know which one of you is the idiot.
Since light travels faster than sound, some people appears bright - until you hear them speak.

Why we should be against censorship in a court of law: Publicity is the very soul of justice … it keeps the judge himself, while trying, under trial. - Jeremy Bentham

"Our government is like a baby's alimentary canal, with a happy appetite at one end and no responsibility at the other. " - Ronald Reagan


Government fed by the people

Government fed by the people

Career options

Career options
I suggest government... because nobody has ever been caught.

Corruption so prevalent it affects English language?

Corruption so prevalent it affects English language?

When there's too much dirt...

When there's too much dirt...
We need better tools... to cover up mega corruptions.

Prevent bullying now!

Prevent bullying now!
If you're not going to speak up, how is the world supposed to know you exist? “Orang boleh pandai setinggi langit, tapi selama ia tidak menulis, ia akan hilang di dalam masyarakat dan dari sejarah.” - Ananta Prameodya Toer (Your intellect may soar to the sky but if you do not write, you will be lost from society and to history.)

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

A bit on Taiwanese and Hokien culture

I am not Chinese educated and therefore know little about Chinese culture, other than being brought up by parents, especially my mother who practised Taoism and ancestor worship.

Recently, I had been watching some Taiwanese serials, like Taiwan Tornado, to learn more about Hokien as spoken by the Taiwanese, and at the same time know more about their culture and beliefs which are mainly common to us.

One of the things I noticed which I find familiar with, is the strong filial piety shown by family members. This is despite the almost constant arguments among family members and those related in one way or other. During arguments, each will call the other by his or her full names! Eg. 'Huan Zhilong!...' and the response, 'Ang Bee Hua!...' Incidentally, Cheng hates to be called by her Mandarin name, 'Wang Cheng Wen', because that was how she was scolded by her mum when young! Must be really effective in showing one's displeasure.

Another common aspect of Taiwanese culture (uncommon here) is the act of kneeling to show one's apology. It is common to say 'Seet lay' while doing so, followed by 'heebang … guanliong.' which means, 'Sorry, hope for your forgiveness.' I don't think there is any other culture which practises kneeling so much in showing one's sincerity (though might be put on by pressure under the circumstances) in an apology. In Taiwan Tornado, even the Chairman of a large corporation had to kneel as one of the conditions for sorting out his company's financial problems. Even a hardcore gang leader and killer too, when he was feeling remorseful of his past murders.

As for filial piety, there were instances of having to do so even at the altar of dead ancestors, for ceremony like wedding; formal adoption; or formal apology for past mistakes. I think Chinese triad gangs still practise some form of religious rites like mixing each other's blood and praying in front of the altar of gods to show full commitment to each other like blood brothers and to their common cause. Filial piety, though scarcely practised in modern Chinese families, could still be found in Taiwan, according to the following report...

(An exceptionally filial son, a dying breed)

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