How should we judge a government?

In Malaysia, if you don't watch television or read newspapers, you are uninformed; but if you do, you are misinformed!

"If you're not careful, the newspapers will have you hating the people who are being oppressed, and loving the people who are doing the oppressing." - Malcolm X

Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience - Mark Twain
Never argue with an idiot, otherwise people won't know which one of you is the idiot.
Since light travels faster than sound, some people appears bright - until you hear them speak.

Why we should be against censorship in a court of law: Publicity is the very soul of justice … it keeps the judge himself, while trying, under trial. - Jeremy Bentham

"Our government is like a baby's alimentary canal, with a happy appetite at one end and no responsibility at the other. " - Ronald Reagan


Government fed by the people

Government fed by the people

Career options

Career options
I suggest government... because nobody has ever been caught.

Corruption so prevalent it affects English language?

Corruption so prevalent it affects English language?

When there's too much dirt...

When there's too much dirt...
We need better tools... to cover up mega corruptions.

Prevent bullying now!

Prevent bullying now!
If you're not going to speak up, how is the world supposed to know you exist? “Orang boleh pandai setinggi langit, tapi selama ia tidak menulis, ia akan hilang di dalam masyarakat dan dari sejarah.” - Ananta Prameodya Toer (Your intellect may soar to the sky but if you do not write, you will be lost from society and to history.)

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

P. Gunasegaran's take on the proposed High Speed Rail Link from KL to Singapore

Before I post the excerpt of the article, just wish to point out that I cannot find it from The Star's link. Very strange indeed. Is it being blocked?

The following is from another site, Transitmy, which commented on it...

'Why we should look for cheaper alternatives before embarking on an expensive rail link to Singapore
STRANGELY, one reason given for a high-speed rail link between Malaysia and Singapore is that it will increase property values in Kuala Lumpur.
The way it is phrased is interesting, “unlock property values in Kuala Lumpur.” Tell me, who locked property values in Kuala Lumpur in the first place? Perhaps that is key to understanding this convoluted logic.
I can understand that it reduces travel time between Kuala Lumpur and Singapore considerably – by land that is. I can see how it might – might – improve tourist arrivals here, though I don’t see why the ingresses into Malaysia right now are insufficient.
Thailand and Indonesia don’t have high-speed rail links to anywhere but that has not stopped a burgeoning in their tourist arrivals. In fact, the easiest access to these countries continues to be by air. Lack of rail links has certainly not hampered Bali, for instance – the planes make a beeline to it.
The Government through one of its agencies, the Public Land Transport Commission, expects to finish a feasibility study in eight weeks. But let’s do a back-of-the-envelop, quick feasibility study here, which may take, oh, about eight minutes.
The cost, we presume before land acquisition and rolling stock (trains to you and me), is expected be RM8bil–RM14bil. Let’s take the upper end, because by the time all approvals are obtained, that’s how much it will cost and add to it a further RM6bil as land acquisition and contingency costs.
That brings the figure up to a nice neat RM20bil. And let’s say we need a return on this of 10% a year. That means a net profit of RM2bil a year, a huge amount which only a handful of public-listed companies achieve. And let’s say that takes a revenue of 10 times that or RM20bil a year!
That RM20bil is less than the entire revenue of both AirAsia and Malaysia Airlines in a year, implying that we will not in the near future get anywhere near the revenue required to make this rail link profitable on a standalone basis.
Conclusion: It is not commercially viable.'
Link

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